Time to start a new Chapter…

… in the Book of Bitcoin.  There comes a time in every story when the characters develop, evolve, die, or are reborn.  Such is one of those times in the grand adventure which we all started off on 8 years ago.  The Bitcoin Cash fork having successfully executed is now free from the oppressive roadmap which was being driven by Blockstream and Core, which would see most of Bitcoin transactions turned into just channel opening/closing tasks for untested 2nd Layer networks better suited for micropayments.

So in that vein, I would like to show everyone that micropayment payment channel applications don’t need to wait for Lightning Networks!  Yours.org is a homegrown, build by Bitcoiners, for Bitcoiners, paywall content platform that started off writing their own version of payment channels because LN wasn’t (still isn’t!) ready, then moved onto Litecoin because Bitcoin transactions got too expensive, but now thanks to the low fees on Bitcoin Cash, has moved onto BCC.  As such, I would like to support them by moving my blog onto Yours.org on a sort of a trial run.  Therefore, this month’s blog will be published there.  Yes, you will have to fund a BCC/BCH wallet in order to read the whole article. Yes, it doesn’t seem to support embedding media such as pictures inline yet.  But I hope that Ryan X. and team will be able to slowly improve their platform to the level of Medium or WordPress sometime, and it isn’t terribly hard to get your hands on $5 worth of BCC and funding the Yours.org wallet is dead simple.  Send BCC and it is instantly credited (no need to wait for confirms).

So without further adieu, I leave you enjoy reading about (and using!) Bitcoin Cash:

Bitcoin is Dead, Long Live Bitcoin! (cash)

If we are going to grow this community, we are going to have to start supporting its own economy, eat our own dogfood, so to speak.

 

 

Keep the Change! — Replay protection is a Red Herring

Much about the current Bitcoin splitting debate has revolved around the notion of a hard fork splitting of the network being dangerous. So dangerous, in fact, that core developers have constantly stuck to the argument that the community should trust in their (exclusive) council in order to ensure that we don’t engage in anything that may be unsafe for ourselves. Trust them, they know what is good for us. When libertarians and skeptics around the world hear that they are immediately put on alert.

Most recently an exchange between ex-Bitcoin lead maintainer Gavin Andresen with Core contributor Matt Corallo was especially interesting.  Besides the run-of-the-mill talking past each other where Matt seems to ignore points that Gavin clearly addressed (regarding n**2 sighash issues, solved by capping txn sizes to 1mb) the core theme (pun intended) repeated again by Matt was that Hard Forks have no community support (by his own judgement) which is clearly shown by the fact that nobody seems to be giving much attention to the HF proposals in his (exclusive core dev curated) proposal list.  Not much surprise here, the standard echo-chamber reality distortion field stuff.  What was interesting, was that he once again mentioned the need, nay, the necessity of ‘replay protection’ in ANY hard fork proposal.  This is very important point in the core dev platform, as it serves a dual purpose.  One which on the surface is ostensibly for the public good, the other may be much more shadowy.  Let’s examine what replay protection is, and why we really don’t need it.

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